01.22.13

Kentucky Equine Survey Releases Initial Findings

Posted in Kentucky Horse Council, University of Kentucky at 7:59 pm by EPR

Kentucky Horse Council, Inc.

Press Release from the
University of Kentucky
Contact:
Jill Stowe, 859-257-7256
Nancy Cox, 859-257-3333
By Holly Wiemers

Kentucky Equine Survey Releases Initial Findings

Kristen Harvey's photo of Maine Chance Farm filly LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2013) – Kentucky is home to 242,400 horses and the total value of the state’s equine and equine-related assets is estimated at $23.4 billion, according to the 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey.

The comprehensive statewide survey of all breeds of horses, ponies, donkeys and mules was the first such study since 1977. Conducted between June and October 2012 by the Kentucky field office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, with support and assistance by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture and the Kentucky Horse Council, the survey’s results identified 35,000 equine operations and 1.1 million acres devoted to equine use. The results are a snapshot of the 2011 calendar year.

“The value of Kentucky’s equine and equine-related assets, such as land and buildings, is significantly larger than other states for which we have data, and it serves to underscore that Kentucky is the Horse Capital of the World,” said Jill Stowe, UK associate professor in agricultural economics and project lead. “Upcoming economic impact analysis results will provide even more details regarding the importance of the industry to the state’s economy.”

Phase 1 of the study was a statewide survey of equine operations that included an inventory of all breeds of equine, including horses, ponies, donkeys and mules. It included a look at sales, income, expenses and assets of those operations. County-level results from Phase 1 are expected soon. Phase 2 of the project will entail an economic impact analysis of Kentucky’s equine industry. Phase 2 information will be available mid-2013.

With regard to the inventory of Kentucky’s equine operations, the study determined that 56 percent are farms or ranches and 30 percent are for personal use, while 3 percent are boarding, training or riding facilities. Breeding operations accounted for 2 percent.

The vast majority of horses inventoried were light horses (216,300), followed by donkeys and mules (14,000), ponies (7,000) and draft horses (5,100). Thoroughbreds are the most prevalent breed in the state (54,000), followed by Quarter Horses (42,000), Tennessee Walking Horses (36,000), Saddlebreds (14,000), donkeys, mules and burros, Mountain Horse breeds (12,500) and Standardbreds (9,500).

“The University of Kentucky study objectively and scientifically validates the importance of the horse industry to our state. This may well be the most significant body of work ever undertaken to estimate the economic significance of horses to Kentucky,” said Norman K. Luba, executive director of the North American Equine Ranching Information Council. “As horse industry enthusiasts, we are indebted to the University of Kentucky, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund and the Kentucky Horse Council.”

The primary use of the majority of Kentucky’s equines is trail riding/pleasure (79,500), followed by broodmares (38,000), horses currently idle/not working (33,000), competition/show (24,500), horses currently growing, including yearlings, weanlings and foals (23,000), racing (15,000), work/transportation (12,500), breeding stallions (3,900) and other activities (13,000).

“Kentucky’s horse industry is important to a diverse set of people across the Commonwealth, from the 9-year-old 4-H member with her pony to the retired school teacher who just took up trail riding,” said Anna Zinkhon, Kentucky Horse Council Board president. “It is the Kentucky Horse Council’s goal to keep this industry alive and growing. The Kentucky Equine Survey provides us with the numbers, so we’ll know how to develop programs to emphasize strengths as well as work on improving areas of need. It is an important window into the future.”

According to the study, the estimated value of the 242,400 equines in Kentucky is about $6.3 billion. In addition, the estimated value of equine-related assets, including land and buildings, vehicles and equipment, feed and supplies and tack and equestrian clothing, is $17.1 billion, bringing the total value of Kentucky’s equine and equine-related assets to $23.4 billion.

The total of all equine-related sales and income for equine operations in 2011 was about $1.1 billion. That total came from sales of all equines, estimated to be $521.1 million, and $491 million in income from services provided, including both breeding and non-breeding services such as training, lessons, boarding, farrier, transportation, purses, incentives, etc.

The study found that total equine-related expenditures by equine operations in 2011 totaled about $1.2 billion. Capital expenditures by equine operations, including the purchase of equines, real estate and improvements and equipment, were estimated to be $337 million. Operating expenditures, including expenses paid for boarding, feed, bedding, veterinary, supplies, farrier services, breeding, maintenance and repair, insurance premiums, utilities and fuel, taxes, rent and/or lease, fees and payments, shipping and travel, training and other fees, totaled $839 million. Notably, 77 percent of these operating expenses were spent in Kentucky.

“We are pleased that this Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund investment made by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board will provide benefits to one of our state’s signature industries,” said Roger Thomas, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy. “The results of this survey will validate the economic benefits of all breeds of equine to Kentucky’s overall economy.”

“The College of Agriculture is proud of this project because first and foremost, it represents the best available methods of surveying that universities and government can provide. But the most compelling aspect of this study is that our future policy discussions can be guided by solid numbers. We thank the Kentucky Horse Council and the Governor’s Office of Ag Policy as well as our numerous donors, for recognizing how much the Horse Capital of the World needs a sound foundation for policy decisions,” said Nancy Cox, associate dean for research in UK’s College of Agriculture, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station director and administrative leader for UK Ag Equine Programs.

Funding for the project was provided by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, along with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, the Kentucky Horse Council and numerous other industry organizations and individuals, a complete listing of which can be found on the project’s website.

More information about the 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey can be found on the UK Ag Equine Programs website at http://www2.ca.uky.edu/equine/kyequinesurvey or on Kentucky Horse Council’s website at http://www.kentuckyhorse.org/. A copy of the complete Phase 1 results, including county-level breakdowns, will also be posted on both of these websites when they become available.

Writer: Holly Wiemers, 859-257-2226

UK College of Agriculture, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

UK Ag Equine Programs
(formerly UK Equine Initiative) |
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture | N212 Ag. Science Bldg. North |
Lexington KY 40546-0091 | Office: 859-257-2226 | Fax: 859-323-8484 | www.ca.uky.edu/equine


ABOUT THE KENTUCKY HORSE COUNCIL – The Kentucky Horse Council is a non-profit organization dedicated, through education and leadership, to the protection and development of the Kentucky equine community. The Kentucky Horse Council provides educational programs and information, outreach and communication to Kentucky horse owners and enthusiasts, equine professional networking opportunities through KENA, trail riding advocacy, health and welfare programs, and personal liability insurance and other membership benefits.  The specialty Kentucky Horse Council license plate, featuring a foal lying in the grass, provides the primary source of revenue for KHC programs.
Contact:

Ginny Grulke
Executive Director
Phone:  859.367.0509
director@kentuckyhorse.org

Kentucky Horse Council

1500 Bull Lea Rd, Suite 214C
Lexington, KY 40511
Phone:  859.367.0509
www.kentuckyhorse.org

08.23.10

Keeneland Fall Schedule (WEG Impact)

Posted in 2010 Games, Keeneland, Kentucky, Lexington, University of Kentucky, World Equestrian Games at 10:45 pm by Thomas

Keeneland’s Fall Meet runs Friday, October 8th through Saturday, October 30; post time 1:00 PM.

Basic Schedule for the 3 days overlapping with the Games follows with info and the Grade races.

October 8, 2010

Fall Race Meet – Live Racing
Opening Day Fall Meeting
Darley Alcibiades (G1)
Phoenix (G3)
FallStars Weekend

October 9, 2010

Shadwell Turf Mile (G1)
Dixiana Breeders’ Futurity (G1)
Thoroughbred Club of America (G2)
Abu Dhabi First Lady (G1)
Woodford (G3)
The President of the United Arab Emirates Cup (G1)

October 10, 2010

Juddmonte Spinster (G1)
Bourbon (G3)

Traffic Impacts:   Keeneland opens at 11 AM and is located on the West side of Lexington with the primary bottlenecks being Man O War/Versailles Road at the entrance to Keeneland and Versailles Road/New Circle Road ~ 2 miles East of the main entrance.  The last race generally runs about 5 PM so on Friday the impact will be doubled with normal rush hour traffic.  On Saturday the University of Kentucky (Wildcats) football team will be taking on the Auburn (Tigers)  at home but I will post more information about that at a later date when I have more information on the expected impacts, just wanted to get that information out for people planning on coming out for the last weekend of the Games.

Keeneland area map

08.27.09

Parking Solutions for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games Underway

Posted in 2010 Games, Parking, University of Kentucky at 5:57 am by Thomas

The World Games 2010 Foundation today announced the University of Kentucky’s Coldstream Research Campus as a satellite parking location for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games.

Shuttle transportation services will be provided to spectators at official 2010 Games satellite parking lots directly to the Kentucky Horse Park. Coldstream Research Campus is located five miles from the Kentucky Horse Park, and can hold 8,400 vehicles, providing a safe and efficient shuttle transport system to and from the grounds of the Games.

“We are very excited to be a part of the World Equestrian Games and work with the foundation staff to provide a major park and ride site for all of the visitors who will attend the Games,” said Tina Carpenter, UK Coldstream Research Campus executive director.

“The Coldstream Research Campus site provides an ideal location for satellite parking during the 2010 Games,” said Jamie Link, Foundation CEO. “The site will allow spectators to park as closely as possible to the Kentucky Horse Park, with easy and friendly transportation services to  the Games.”

In addition to the primary parking location at Coldstream Research Campus, the World Games 2010 Foundation will be offering a limited number of premium spaces on the Kentucky Horse Park grounds for purchase online. More information about purchasing on-site parking will be available when tickets go on sale September 25, 2009.

More detailed information on parking and transportation systems for the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games will be available in the spring of 2010.

About the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games
The Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games are the world championships of eight equestrian disciplines recognized by the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI). Her Royal Highness Princess Haya is the current president of the FEI. The Games are held every four years and this will be the first occurrence in the United States.

The Games will be broadcast on NBC Sports, which has marked the largest commitment to network coverage of equestrian sport in U.S. television history. The 2010 Games are expected to have a statewide economic impact of $150 million, and current sponsors include Alltech, Rolex, John Deere, Ariat International, Inc. and Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital. For more information on the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games, please visit www.alltechfeigames.com.

About the University of Kentucky Coldstream Research Campus

Business and research connect at the University of Kentucky Coldstream Research Campus, a premier location at the intersection of I-75/I-64 and just minutes from the University of Kentucky. Partnerships with UK feature strong R&D programs in ag biotech, equine research, biofuels and pharmaceutical development. Once a prominent Bluegrass horse farm, Coldstream is now the business home for more than 1,000 employees and 55 biotech, pharmaceutical and equine companies, IBM, HP, Embassy Suites Hotel and others. Contact: Coldstream@uky.edu, www.UKColdstream.com, 859.231.TECH (8324).