01.22.13

Kentucky Equine Survey Releases Initial Findings

Posted in Kentucky Horse Council, University of Kentucky at 7:59 pm by EPR

Kentucky Horse Council, Inc.

Press Release from the
University of Kentucky
Contact:
Jill Stowe, 859-257-7256
Nancy Cox, 859-257-3333
By Holly Wiemers

Kentucky Equine Survey Releases Initial Findings

Kristen Harvey's photo of Maine Chance Farm filly LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 22, 2013) – Kentucky is home to 242,400 horses and the total value of the state’s equine and equine-related assets is estimated at $23.4 billion, according to the 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey.

The comprehensive statewide survey of all breeds of horses, ponies, donkeys and mules was the first such study since 1977. Conducted between June and October 2012 by the Kentucky field office of the National Agricultural Statistics Service, with support and assistance by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture and the Kentucky Horse Council, the survey’s results identified 35,000 equine operations and 1.1 million acres devoted to equine use. The results are a snapshot of the 2011 calendar year.

“The value of Kentucky’s equine and equine-related assets, such as land and buildings, is significantly larger than other states for which we have data, and it serves to underscore that Kentucky is the Horse Capital of the World,” said Jill Stowe, UK associate professor in agricultural economics and project lead. “Upcoming economic impact analysis results will provide even more details regarding the importance of the industry to the state’s economy.”

Phase 1 of the study was a statewide survey of equine operations that included an inventory of all breeds of equine, including horses, ponies, donkeys and mules. It included a look at sales, income, expenses and assets of those operations. County-level results from Phase 1 are expected soon. Phase 2 of the project will entail an economic impact analysis of Kentucky’s equine industry. Phase 2 information will be available mid-2013.

With regard to the inventory of Kentucky’s equine operations, the study determined that 56 percent are farms or ranches and 30 percent are for personal use, while 3 percent are boarding, training or riding facilities. Breeding operations accounted for 2 percent.

The vast majority of horses inventoried were light horses (216,300), followed by donkeys and mules (14,000), ponies (7,000) and draft horses (5,100). Thoroughbreds are the most prevalent breed in the state (54,000), followed by Quarter Horses (42,000), Tennessee Walking Horses (36,000), Saddlebreds (14,000), donkeys, mules and burros, Mountain Horse breeds (12,500) and Standardbreds (9,500).

“The University of Kentucky study objectively and scientifically validates the importance of the horse industry to our state. This may well be the most significant body of work ever undertaken to estimate the economic significance of horses to Kentucky,” said Norman K. Luba, executive director of the North American Equine Ranching Information Council. “As horse industry enthusiasts, we are indebted to the University of Kentucky, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund and the Kentucky Horse Council.”

The primary use of the majority of Kentucky’s equines is trail riding/pleasure (79,500), followed by broodmares (38,000), horses currently idle/not working (33,000), competition/show (24,500), horses currently growing, including yearlings, weanlings and foals (23,000), racing (15,000), work/transportation (12,500), breeding stallions (3,900) and other activities (13,000).

“Kentucky’s horse industry is important to a diverse set of people across the Commonwealth, from the 9-year-old 4-H member with her pony to the retired school teacher who just took up trail riding,” said Anna Zinkhon, Kentucky Horse Council Board president. “It is the Kentucky Horse Council’s goal to keep this industry alive and growing. The Kentucky Equine Survey provides us with the numbers, so we’ll know how to develop programs to emphasize strengths as well as work on improving areas of need. It is an important window into the future.”

According to the study, the estimated value of the 242,400 equines in Kentucky is about $6.3 billion. In addition, the estimated value of equine-related assets, including land and buildings, vehicles and equipment, feed and supplies and tack and equestrian clothing, is $17.1 billion, bringing the total value of Kentucky’s equine and equine-related assets to $23.4 billion.

The total of all equine-related sales and income for equine operations in 2011 was about $1.1 billion. That total came from sales of all equines, estimated to be $521.1 million, and $491 million in income from services provided, including both breeding and non-breeding services such as training, lessons, boarding, farrier, transportation, purses, incentives, etc.

The study found that total equine-related expenditures by equine operations in 2011 totaled about $1.2 billion. Capital expenditures by equine operations, including the purchase of equines, real estate and improvements and equipment, were estimated to be $337 million. Operating expenditures, including expenses paid for boarding, feed, bedding, veterinary, supplies, farrier services, breeding, maintenance and repair, insurance premiums, utilities and fuel, taxes, rent and/or lease, fees and payments, shipping and travel, training and other fees, totaled $839 million. Notably, 77 percent of these operating expenses were spent in Kentucky.

“We are pleased that this Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund investment made by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board will provide benefits to one of our state’s signature industries,” said Roger Thomas, executive director of the Governor’s Office of Agricultural Policy. “The results of this survey will validate the economic benefits of all breeds of equine to Kentucky’s overall economy.”

“The College of Agriculture is proud of this project because first and foremost, it represents the best available methods of surveying that universities and government can provide. But the most compelling aspect of this study is that our future policy discussions can be guided by solid numbers. We thank the Kentucky Horse Council and the Governor’s Office of Ag Policy as well as our numerous donors, for recognizing how much the Horse Capital of the World needs a sound foundation for policy decisions,” said Nancy Cox, associate dean for research in UK’s College of Agriculture, Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station director and administrative leader for UK Ag Equine Programs.

Funding for the project was provided by the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, along with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, the Kentucky Horse Council and numerous other industry organizations and individuals, a complete listing of which can be found on the project’s website.

More information about the 2012 Kentucky Equine Survey can be found on the UK Ag Equine Programs website at http://www2.ca.uky.edu/equine/kyequinesurvey or on Kentucky Horse Council’s website at http://www.kentuckyhorse.org/. A copy of the complete Phase 1 results, including county-level breakdowns, will also be posted on both of these websites when they become available.

Writer: Holly Wiemers, 859-257-2226

UK College of Agriculture, through its land-grant mission, reaches across the commonwealth with teaching, research and extension to enhance the lives of Kentuckians.

UK Ag Equine Programs
(formerly UK Equine Initiative) |
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture | N212 Ag. Science Bldg. North |
Lexington KY 40546-0091 | Office: 859-257-2226 | Fax: 859-323-8484 | www.ca.uky.edu/equine


ABOUT THE KENTUCKY HORSE COUNCIL – The Kentucky Horse Council is a non-profit organization dedicated, through education and leadership, to the protection and development of the Kentucky equine community. The Kentucky Horse Council provides educational programs and information, outreach and communication to Kentucky horse owners and enthusiasts, equine professional networking opportunities through KENA, trail riding advocacy, health and welfare programs, and personal liability insurance and other membership benefits.  The specialty Kentucky Horse Council license plate, featuring a foal lying in the grass, provides the primary source of revenue for KHC programs.
Contact:

Ginny Grulke
Executive Director
Phone:  859.367.0509
director@kentuckyhorse.org

Kentucky Horse Council

1500 Bull Lea Rd, Suite 214C
Lexington, KY 40511
Phone:  859.367.0509
www.kentuckyhorse.org

01.21.13

Kentucky Round-Up 2013: Still Needed!

Posted in Kentucky Horse Council, Kentucky Horse Park at 10:30 pm by EPR

Kentucky Round-Up CC Header

Still Needed!
The Kentucky Round-Up is a huge event!  We are advertising it broadly, including websites, emails, print ads and billboards. We will expand it next year.
Your help is needed for a number of things:
  • “Like” the KY Round-Up Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/KentuckyRoundUp) to getr updates and also spread the word.
  • Ads for the program. The ads help pay for printing of the program which will be given to each attendee for no cost.  Business card ads are only $60 and Logos only are $40 ADS DUE WEDNESDAY JAN. 23rd.
    (PRINT PROGRAM AD RATE SHEET)
  • Vendors.  We are hearing a lot of buzz and expect over 2,500 people!  The more the merrier on vendors!  Vendor spots are only $150 (business) and $100 (nonprofit).
    (PRINT VENDOR FORM.)
    (VIEW CURRENT VENDORS)
  • Sponsors.  We still have room for additional sponsors! Sponsorships start at $250 and go to $10,000.  If you know a farm, a business, or a supportive individual or association, please ask them to consider sponsoring so this event can be as successful as possible.
    (PRINT SPONSOR FORM.)
  • Spread the word.  Tell your friends and neighbors! We have many activities for people who don’t own horses, as well as those who do.  We have a large poster which we can send for posting in your area.
  • Volunteers for planning committee for 2014 Kentucky Round-Up.  (EMAIL GINNY, EXEC. DIRECTOR)

Thank You

Kentucky Round-Up Volunteers Needed!

Posted in Events of Interest, Kentucky Horse Council, Kentucky Horse Park, Volunteerism at 10:25 pm by EPR

We need some KY Round-Up Volunteers — for a few hours 
The Kentucky Round-Up will be jam packed with families, kids, horsemen, horses, vendors, classes, demonstrations, clinics….
We need your help.  We have estimated a need for 50 volunteers for the day.  We currently have about 25.
Please consider volunteering for just a few hours.  Volunteers get free admission, a $10 meal allowance, and a free Kentucky Round-Up T-Shirt. And our heartfelt thanks!
VOLUNTEER SIGN-UP
Here are the areas we still need help with:
(Visit kentuckyroundup.com for descriptions of the activities in each area.)
The Ticket Booth                Have 3 people, could use 2 more                                             at 7:30AM
Barn                                         2 people
Horse Demonstrations              Possible 4 (waiting to hear                                                     from college group)
Clinics                                      2 people
Paddock                                   5 people
Kids Corrall                               2 people
Concourse                                4 people
Stable                                      3 people
Set Up Friday Night (4 – 10)      4 people
Break Down Saturday Night       3 people
CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP
Thank You!
Kentucky Round-Up benefits the following organizations:
New Beginnings Ronald mcDonald Charities KHC Youth

01.14.13

South Africa Tourism, model for Kentucky Tourism!

Posted in Adventure Tourism, Bluegrass Region, Destination Tourism, Kentucky, South Africa, Tourism, Travel at 10:27 pm by Thomas

I am recently back from my third(3rd) trip to South Africa in the past year having spent a total of nearly 6 weeks there and I have learned quite a bit.  Most of what drove the South African Economy of the past was mineral(Gold, Diamonds, Rare Earth Minerals, etc…) wealth.  As that has begun to decline South Africa’s other major industry, tourism has come into its own.

I am not going to beat around the bush, the thing that South African Tourism does well, is to sell South Africa as a Destination and a one of a kind experience, somewhere you go and spend a week or two.  This is something that I don’t feel Kentucky does and I am sure I will get many people who will disagree with me on that, but at the very least I will get most of those people to agree we do not do it to the degree we could and should.

Now to be fair, South Africa has some natural advantages that Kentucky does not but Kentucky has a beauty that I would put up against any place in the World and its own unique character that makes it a Great Tourism Destination.  The key with Destination Tourism is that you really are trying to sell to a far off audience, like South African’s, Europeans or just about anybody else on the planet.

I feel there are 4 keys to developing Kentucky as a Great Destination.

  1. Natural Beauty – Kentucky has a beauty that comes through in pictures that people find alluring.
  2. Southern Charm – We do posses an inviting personality that people generally find as warm and relaxing after they have been here.  That is something a little harder to convey to people who haven’t been here but it is possible with the right marketing.
  3. Adventure Tourism – Everything from horse back riding, hiking, cycling, boating to the Kentucky Horse Park and Horse Shows.  Activities that people can do with just the clothes on their back and a couple of days.
  4. Location, Location, Location – Kentucky is very centrally located which allows someone to come here and do day and overnight trips to a number of key Cites and sites, such as Nashville or Chicago or Washington DC.  Even New York City or Disney World are simple plane flights away.

While in South Africa we actually did a day trip up to Botswana just to have that experience and to check out the new Bush Babies Lodge on the Limpopo River that separates South Africa from Botswana.  And on our way back to the States, we came via Europe and changed flights in Paris, France on New Year’s Eve just  to get in another destination.  Now to be fair, we were only on the ground 5 hours so didn’t have time to leave the airport, but still I have the experience of saying I was in Paris for New Year’s Eve 2013.

My point being, that is why everyone wants to travel to far off lands and sometimes even the State next door, is for the experience and I have come to the conclusion that there are 7 billion people on the planet that all want to come to Kentucky they just don’t know it yet.  I realize most of those 7 billion people don’t have that luxury of being able to travel that far but there are a lot of people who can and Kentucky needs to be on their list of Destinations they want to visit in their Life times.

Kentucky Colonel
Thomas Demond
KyWEGO